live tweeting [part 1]

Metropolis Online

Week 1 – Metropolis (Lang, 1927)

For my first week of live-tweeting I decided to compile my tweets about Metropolis into a thread. Although this seemed like a great idea in theory, I felt that it didn’t quite work for the live-tweeting experience as each tweet explored a self-contained idea about the film. Threads seemed to be better suited to the stringing together of tweets that focus on the same general topic or argument. I used a literary approach for my analysis of this film, focusing on the ideas and concepts being portrayed on-screen as well as key inter-textual references.

Evidence of live-tweeting and engagement in discussion

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2001-a-space-odyssey-552a7fc41108e-1

Week 2 – 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)

This week I made an effort to draw upon the subject materials in a few of my tweets. I decided not to compile my tweets in a thread so that I could improve the layout of my ideas. I also focused more on engaging in discussion through comments/retweets. This may have been because the film was easier to follow while actively tweeting than the week before, with Metropolis being a silent film that required reading title cards. The content of my tweets focused on a combination of themes expressed in the film and facts about the film’s production.

Evidence of live-tweeting and engagement in discussion

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Week 3 – Westworld (Crichton, 1973)

Having seen the popular television series Westworld based on this film, I went into this week of live-tweeting with some prior knowledge and was able to show that in my tweets. I managed to achieve a good balance between sharing my own tweets and engaging with others this week because of that. This told me that if I were to research the films I am not familiar with more deeply than I had been before, or even pre-screen them the day before, it would probably enrich the quality and quantity of my live-tweeting significantly. My tweets contained a lot of comparison between the original film and the series, and also included terms and ideas from the subject materials.

Evidence of live-tweeting and engagement in discussion

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Bladerunner by Chris Thornley (Regular)

Week 4 – Blade Runner (Scott, 1982)

This week was another film that I was familiar with which benefited my analysis once again. My best tweets were those that referenced the subject materials and included GIFs to support the idea being expressed. I chose to include more live commentary-style tweets this week to see how much engagement they would receive. I feel like I produced a good mix of different content for each tweet. Something I needed to work on in the future was including more details about production and the context in which each film was created.

Evidence of live-tweeting and engagement in discussion

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Week 5 – Minority Report (Spielberg, 2002)

For this week of live-tweeting we were thrown a curve ball; the planned film for screening was not available for rent or on any streaming services in Australia. So, the film was changed to Minority Report. This meant that my prepared research would not be useful for this live-tweeting session. Despite this I think I did well at going with the flow and engaging in discussion. I focused on trying to incorporate references to the subject materials in most of my tweets. Again I did not explore the film’s context and production as much as I would have liked to, but this is likely because of my lack of preparation.

Evidence of live-tweeting and engagement in discussion

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Final thoughts and reflection

Going into the next few weeks of screenings, I feel as though my live-tweeting skills have improved and my content+engagement from now onward will be of higher quality and quantity. I’m more confident in being able to prepare and execute tweets that explore each film’s themes, context, and relevance to the subject topics. Something I could definitely improve on in the future would be incorporating links to articles or sources that have informed my research in some tweets. I’ve realised upon reviewing my tweets that I neglected to do this, while some other students will often link articles and academic sources. I’ve learnt which tweets capture the attention of my peers and receive meaningful engagement and will apply this knowledge to my future live-tweets. Some examples include tweets that live-commentate the action on screen, tweets that are supported visually by GIFs, and tweets that analyse how the weekly subject topics relate to the chosen film.

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